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                                                            (03/12.2020)

         TRIVIA NIGHT CANCELLED

In light of increasing health concerns about the Coronavirus (COVID-19), the Sangamon County Historical Society has cancelled its 8th annual Trivia Night that was scheduled to be held on Saturday, March 21. 

Our primary concern is the health and safety of our community. We are joining other Illinois organizations in taking this precautionary measure where public gatherings are planned. 

If you have already sent a check or have processed a payment and it’s in the mail, we will return your payment in the next few days. If your payment has not been cashed, we will return the check to you or your organization or if it has been cashed, we will issue a check to you from the Society.
 


NEWS ARCHIVES...NEWS ARCHIVES...NEWS ARCHIVES

 

(03/01/2020)

IT'S TIME TO PLAY TRIVIA!

     That's right! And if you haven't squared away a seat at the Sangamon County His-torical Society's Eighth Annual Trivia Night on Saturday, March 21, don't fret...but don't wait. 
     You can be part of the play simply by mailing in a check or signing up on-line by following the Trivia Night link on the home page of this website. 
 
     "We think this will be the biggest and best one yet," says event chair Mary Alice Davis, who has coordinated the fundraiser since its inception. "The players are always enthusiastic and share the fun of coming up with the right answers as they compete to be among the winning tables." 
     Up to 300 players can test their general knowledge, answering 10 questions in 10 categories of questions posted on a large screen on one end of the Parish Hall at Christ the King Church, 1221 Barberry Drive, Springfield. “Anyone can play,” Davis says. “The subject matter is broad and when you’re at a table of friends, family or new acquaintences, it makes the competition that much more fun. 
     The doors open at 6 p.m., the game begins at 7 p.m. Chilli prepared by champion chilli-maker Les Estep will be on sale throughout the evening, along with beer, wine, soda, water and desserts. Well-known trivia guru Al Gietl will be providing the questions, paired with popular former WICS-TV meteorologist Joe Crain who will serve as emcee for the evening. Crain now directs public programs for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. 
      A panel of celebrity judges will review each table’s answers while a tally-team keeps track of the scores. At the end of the evening, one table of players will share the $200 first prize, a second table the $100 second prize and $75 to the third top table of players. Tickets are $10 per person, $100 for a table of 10. 
     Proceeds from the event singularly benefit the Society's Special Projects Grants Fund that underwrites local history projects. “We’ve supported more than two dozen history projects since starting the Special Project Grants program in 2013 that has resulted in the creation and placement of important historic markers across the county, youth and education programs, history broadcasts and so much more,” noted Elaine Hoff, chair of the Society’s Special Project Grants committee. “We give a lot of thought to those projects we select each year, both for their abil-ity to enrich our knowledge of Sangamon County and the long-lasting significance to the community.” 
      All monies raised from Trivia Night, be it though ticket sales, food, and Round sponsorships, go directly into the Special Projects Grant fund, Hoff adds. “That’s why it is so important to us that it be successful. An event like this reaches across all interests and ages and benefits us all.”


 Special Project Grants 
Applications Now Available On-Line 

      Applications are now available for downloading from this website for individuals and organizations interested in applying for the Society's annual Special Project Grants. Go to the
 link on the Grants section for an application form. 
     The deadline for applying for a grant is April 30. 
     The Special Project Grants committee, headed by Society board member Elaine Hoff, will review the applications in May. Winners announced in June at the Society's annual dinner to which the recipients will be invited. 
     The grant program provides financial underpinnings for small but significant Sangamon County history projects pro-posed by individuals and organizations who can complete their work within a 12-month period. 
     The Society usually sets aside a total of $3,000 a year for the Special Projects Grant program whose winners are deter-mined by a committee. If less than $3,000 is awarded in any given year, the additional funds are applied to the overall total the following year or kept in reserve. Funds for the program are raised through the Society’s annual Trivia Night, the eighth year of the event to be held on Saturday, March 21. 
Since the program began in 2013, the Society’s Special Projects Grant program has funded 25 projects ranging from sign-age programs that help communities better understand their local history to underwri-ing research for a museum display on early African-American pioneers who settled in Sangamon County and surrounding areas in Central Illinois. 
     Special Project grant funds have also been used to digitize and preserve blue-prints of Sacred Heart Chapel and Ursula Hall Music Conservatory in Springfield designed by William Conway, Spring-field’s first architect. 
     Last year, Special Project grants went to five organizations: Central 3 Community First Project for signage associated with the preservation of Springfield’s first black firehouse and its role during the 1908 race riot; the Springfield and Central Illinois African American History Museum to help fund an exhibit on national Negro League players from Springfield and Central Illinois; and construction funds for the Pleas-ant Plains Historical Society to rebuild wheel chairs ramps at its Clayville Historic Site. 
     Also winning grants in 2019 were Oak Ridge National Cemetery for an interpretive marker about its former third street entrance sign; and the Springfield Art Association’s Historic Edwards Place for a traveling history trunk program to bring history into the classroom.


HISTORY LESSON: Speaking to members and guests of the Sangamon County Historical Society and the program's co-sponsor, the Springfield and Central Illinois African American History Museum on February 18, Chicago-based journalist Logan Jaffe detailed the steps she took in researching and writing "The Legend of A-N-N-A: Revisiting an American Town where Black People Weren't Welcome After Dark," jointly published this past November by The Atlantic Monthly and ProPublica Illinois. Anna, a small (population 4,000) community in southern Illinois, mirrors many of its counterparts across the state and around the nation as a former "Sundown Town" that from the post Civil War period through the mid 1900s either by legislation, signage, or practice, threat-ened African Americans with harm if they entered or stayed in the community after sunset. Springfield, whose 1908 race riot became a rallying cry for similar events through the 1920s and beyond, was surrounded by small communities who gave no haven to those fleeing the riot, Jaffe noted in a series of slides that illustrated the wide-spread racism in Illinois that extended to news re-ports, real estate, public policy and more and shaped the demographics of communities in the decades that followed. Jaffe, who joined to ProPublica by way of The New York Times and Chicago Public Media (WBEZ), emphasized the important responsibility historical societies and community history organizations have in telling the truth about a community's past. "People are more curious than you think," she said, in detailing her experience talking to Anna residents ignorant of their community's racist past. Larry Stone photos

(02/11/2020)

February 18: Investigating Sundown Towns:
An Overlooked Legacy of Racism in Illinois


     It took 100 years for Springfield to officially mark the 100th anniversary of the 1908 Race Riot. It is taking even longer to have its location designated a national historic site.
     Sometimes lost in the Race Riot's telling is, as one prominent historian noted, "a hidden dimension," the racist actions of white residents in some of the smaller communities surround-ing Springfield who barred entry, threatened and refused aid or shelter to black Springfield residents fleeing the riot for their lives.
     Known as "Sundown" towns, either by ordinance, practice and/or signage, they barred African Americans (and in some cases other ethnic or religious groups) from being in their communities after sunset. And although their actions in the 1908 riot may have faded with time, their long-term impact on residential and racial demo-graphics of Illinois has not.
     Taking a closer look on the subject will be Logan Jaffe, a reporter for Chicago-based ProPublica Illinois, whose story on contemporary Anna, (population 4,000) in Union County, Illinois, "The Legend of A-N-N-A: Re-visiting an American Town Where Black People Weren't Welcome After Dark" was jointly published with Pro-Publica in the November 2019 edition of The Atlantic Monthly.
Jaffee will be the Sangamon County Historical Society's guest speaker on Tuesday, February 18, in a program co-sponsored with the Spring-field and Central Illinois African-American History Museum. The free program begins at 5:30 p.m. in Carnegie Room North, in the city of Springfield's Lincoln Library.
     A-N-N-A, whose name became a catch phrase to describe racist Illinois Sundown communities, drew the interest of   Jaffee, an investigative reporter who traveled to the downstate community after reading James Loewen's extensively researched book, Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism, published in 2005 and updated in 2018. An Illinois native and college professor, Loewen started researching the subject in 1990, expect-ing to find about 10 in the state and 50 around the country. Much to his surprise, he found 507, two thirds of all the towns in Illinois. In the preface to his updated book, he noted that Sun-down towns in Illinois as elsewhere, are on the decline as the nation be-comes more multiracial.
     Jaffee, who came to ProPublica by way of The New York Times and Chicago Public Media (WBEZ), talked to Anna residents and officials, studied census figures and demographics, historic documents and probed the question of whether the community is aware of or willing to confront its history like some other Midwest former Sundown towns have done. For the February meeting, Jaffee will talk about both her research and the interview process by which she put her article together.
      No stranger to the topic, Jaffee was the multimedia producer for WBEZ's Curious City, a journalism project fueled by audience questions about Chicago, and previously an embedded media-maker with The New York Times' Race/Related newsletter in collaboration with the documentary showcase POV, in which she reported and produced an audience-driven project confronting the pervasiveness of racism through everyday objects. Jaffee was also a producer with The New York Times Daily 360 project. In Chicago, she was a recipient of Chicago Film-makers' Digital Media Production Fund for "Battle Flag," an interactive documentary which questions the meaning of the Confederate battle flag in America.
     A Miami native, Jaffee earned her degree in photojournalism from the University of Florida in 2011.


Joe Crain Tapped to Emcee Society’s Eighth Annual Trivia Night March 21

     Joe Crain, the popular former WICS-TV Springfield meteorologist who now directs public programs for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum, will emcee the Society's Eighth Annual Trivia Night fundraiser set for Saturday, March 21 in Parish Hall at Christ the King Church, Springfield.
     Tickets for the event are now on sale on-line at the Society's website, sangamonhistory.org. or can be purchased by mail using a downloadable form from this site Table-purchasing early birds have a sign-up incentive: one or more of 12 reserved up-front tables. Tables of 10 are $100. Individual seats are $10. You can purchase both on line following the link on this site's home page or by mail, by downloading a mail-in form..
     You or your company can sponsor an individual round of questions, with your company logo or message appearing on the screen and announced at the start of one of the 10 rounds of trivia questions that make up the Trivia Game.Round sponsorships are $100. For information about Round sponsorships, contact the Society at sangamon-history@gmail.com or call 217-525-1961.
      With questions and categories devised by well-known Trivia Night guru Al Gietl, tables will be vying for a $200 first prize with second and third prizes of $100 and $75 to the runners up.
      Doors open at 6 p.m., with the game starting at 7 p.m.
     Prize-winning chef Les Estep’s tasty chilli will once again be available to Trivia Night players throughout the evening along with snacks. Wine, beer, soda and water will also be available for purchase.
Proceeds from the event benefit the Sangamon County Historical-Society’s Special Projects fund.

(01/03/2020)

Writers to Share Story Behind the Story January 21

Researching and writing about local history isn't for the faint-hearted. And digging into history can sometimes bring surprising results: backstories, funny facts and a myriad of other information that sometimes doesn't make it into print...or does it?
A team of well-known local writers will share their surprises and more with Society members and guests on Tuesday, January 21 when they gather to discuss...and maybe reveal...some of the more unusual, humorous, and per-haps scandalous historical facts and myth-busters they've discovered as they've plowed through old records, dusty photos or conducted face-to-face interviews.
What they've found and how they've dealt with it will be the focus of the Society's January program meet-ing, 5:30 p.m., Carnegie Room North at the City of Springfield's Lincoln Library. The session is free and open to the public.
The four--Mike Kienzler, Taylor Pensoneau, Cinda Ackerman Klickna, and Tara McClellan McAndrew--are familiar to area history buffs and are all Society members.

After almost 40 years as an editor and reporter for The State Journal-Register, Kienzler retired in 2013 to become the founding editor of SangamonLink.org, the Sangamon County Historical Society's prize-winning online and searchable encyclopedia of Sangamon County history.
A Springfield native, Kienzler is a graduate of Bradley University and received his master’s degree in Public Affairs Reporting from what was then Sangamon State University. He was inducted into the PAR Hall of Fame in 2017. A former president of the old Clayville Folk Arts Guild and a former member of the Illinois State Historical Society advisory board, and he currently is on the board of directors of the Menard County Historical Society.

A native of Bellville, for more than two decades, Pensoneau, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, covered Illinois politics for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch before switching careers and spending 26 years with the Illinois Coal Association.
After retiring from its presidency in 2003, he returned to writing, this time as author of several highly-praised non-fiction books including two on former Illinois governors: Dan Walker, the Glory and the Tragedy and Governor Richard Ogilvie: In the Interest of the State. He also wrote a book about State Senator W. Russell Arlington, Power-house:Arlington from Illinois.
Pensonseau didn't confine all of his research to politics. His book, Brothers Notorious: The Sheltons, documented the exploits of a group of downstate Illinois gangsters and Dapper & Deadly: The True Story of Black Char-lie Harris, chronicled the life of one of the last famous gangsters from south-ern Illinois. He also produced two works of fiction, The Summer of 50 and Falling Star. Pensoneau served as president of the Sangamon County Historical Society from 2006 to 2007 and was the keynote speaker at the Society's annual dinner in 2016.

A freelance writer for more thn 20 years, McAndrew, who holds a bachelor's degree in English and a masters in Public Affairs Reporting, has worked in a variety of media. She has covered Illinois state government for National Public Radio and helped produce pieces for the BBC, Soundprint and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
Her articles have been printed in dozens of magazines and newspapers including The Hollywood Reporter, Chicago Tribune Magazine, Illinois Issues, Christian Parenting Today, and Odyssey. McAndrew has also writ-ten five full-length plays and one-act scripts, several of which were commissioned by local historical sites or agencies. She has spent the last 10 years specializing in writing about history, especially that of Central Illinois and Abraham Lincoln.

Klickna, a free-lance writer whose work frequently appears in Illinois Times, holds a bachelor's degree in English Education from the University of Illinois, Urbana, and a Master’s in Literature from the University of Illinois, Springfield. She taught English in the Springfield School district for many years and held several positions with the Illinois Education Association and the National Education Association.
Klinckna retired in 2017 after serving six years as President of the Illinois Education Association.
A member of the boards of the Dana Thomas House Foundation, the Illinois State Museum Society and the Illinois State Historical Society, Klickna served as a trustee of the Illinois Teachers’ Retirement System from 2003-2019. She is also on the board of the Illinois Educators’ Credit Union and the United Way Education Vision Council.

(11/3/2019)

At November 19 Meeting, ALPLM Oral Historian
Mark DePue to Share War Veterans Memories

   Members and guests of the Sangamon County Historical Society will learn what veterans had to say about the battles they fought in a special post Veteran’s Day pres-entation November 19 with Mark DePue, head of the Oral History Program at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library.
   The program, at 5:30 p.m. in Carnegie Room North at the City of Springfield’s Lin-coln Library, is free and open to the public, resuming the Society’s regular monthly pro-gram schedule.
   DePue’s talk and Powerpoint presentation will focus on the memories of Illinois veterans of World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, the Cold War, Gulf War, and the War on Terror as captured in interviews collected for the Oral History program's "Veterans Remember" series.
A native of Decorah, Iowa, DePue holds a bachelor of science degree from West Point and Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the University of Iowa, He was an Army officer for 25 years. He joined the faculty of Lincoln Land Community College from 2001 to 2005 as an adjunct professor and freelance writer.
DePue served as a senior analyst at the Headquarters of the Army National Guard in Arlington, Virginia before being named Oral Historian for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum and Library in 2006.

(Posted 11/3/2019)


FULL HOUSE: Lincoln historian Timothy Good (right) chats with well-known Ulysses S. Grant reenactor Larry Werline (left) following Good’s presentation October 22 to the Society on the eyewitness reports of Lincoln’s assassination. Werline was among a full house of history buffs on hand for the talk at the City of Springfield’s Lincoln Library that heard Good dispute some of the post-shooting reports. Good is Superintendent of the Lincoln Home in Springfield and was assigned to Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. early in his National Park Service career, inspiring the research that resulted in his book.

(Posted 10/12/19)

October, November Programs to Give
Unique Views of Illinois History, People
 

     October and November will bring some thought-provoking programs to Society members, with speakers well-honed in their subject matter. 
     The Society, which usually holds its program meetings on the third Tuesday of each month, makes an exception in October in order to hear historian Timothy Good share what he learned by taking a close look at the personal accounts of those who were in Ford Theater the night Lincoln was shot that differ from later reports used by historians and others to relate the circumstances surrounding the shooting and its aftermath. 
     Good is no stranger to the Ford's Theater or Lincoln...and no stranger to Springfield, where in his position as superintendent of the Lincoln Home National Historic Site here, began his career 28 years ago with the National Park Service in Washington D.C. at the Ford’s Theater National Historic Site. 
     His book, We Saw Lincoln Shot: One Hundred Eye Witness Accounts will be the foundation of his presentation to the Society at 5:30 p.m. in Carnegie Room North. The program is free and open to the public. 
     Good has also written three other books, American Privateers in the War of 1812: The Vessels and Their Prizes as Recorded in Niles’ Weekly Register, Lincoln for President: An Underdog’s Path to the 1860 Republican Nomination and The Lincoln-Douglas Debates and the Making of a President, reflecting his interests in naval history and American history. 
     Good, who became Superintendent of the Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield in 2018, holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Valparaiso University, a Master of Arts from the University of Durham, England, and earned a diploma from the United States Naval War College.
     The Society resumes its regular meeting third Tuesday of the month schedule on November 19 with a post-Veterans Day program featuring Mark DePue. 
      DePue, head of the Oral History Program at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, will talk about the memories of Illinois veterans of World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, the Cold War, Gulf War, and the War on Terror as captured in interviews for the program's "Veterans Remember" series. 
     The presentation will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Carnegie Room North at the city of Springfield’s Lincoln Library.
     A native of Decorah, Iowa, DePue holds a bachelor of science degree from West Point and Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the University of Iowa, He was an Army officer for 25 years, 
     He joined the faculty of Lincoln Land Community College from 2001 to 2005 as an adjunct professor and freelance writer. Depue served as a senior anaylst at the Headquarters of the Army National Guard in Arlington, Virginia before being named Oral Historian for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum and Library in 2006. 


  
AUTHOR Ken Mitchell shares the untold story of Devereux Heights to a full house of members and guests September 17, kicking off the Society's meeting season at the City of Springfield’s Lincoln Library. His new book, The Little Village That Could, provides insight into Springfield history and its ties to coal mining. Below, Mitchell signs a copy of his book for member Francie Staggs. 


(Posted  9/2/19)

Season Opener September 17

Devereux Heights Finding Place in Local History 
Thanks to Writer/Reseacher With a Story to Tell

     The winds of change can sometimes blow a village off the map. Jobs vanish as industries depart, super-slabs and shopping centers rip across pastures, groves and farm fields. Families move on.
     Except for Devereux Heights, a feisty 106- year-old hamlet on the northern-most end of Springfield that has defied fading away.

      On Tuesday, September 17, you'll learn more about this close-knit neighborhood with deep roots to Sangamon County's past, when author Ken Mitchell shares what he's learned about the area and put into a new book, The Little Village That Could: The Untold Story of Devereux Heights.
     His presentation, kicking off the Society's 2019-2020 program series, begins at 5:30 p.m. in Carnegie Room North in the City of Springfield's Lincoln Library and is free and open to the public.
      Author and raconteur Mitchell is no stranger to Springfield's north end. Among the 15 books and several shorter pieces he's written about the people and places that shaped his life there are North End Pride, The History of Lanphier High School and Growing Up in Rabbit Row, a look at the colorful north side neighborhood in and around Reservoir Street from Ninth to 15th Streets in which his father grew up. Reservoir Park, once one of the city’s most popular and beautiful family recreation areas that was plowed under in the early 1930s to make way for the construction of Lanphier High School.

     While doing research for North End Pride, Mitchell's curiosity about other small North End neighborhoods was piqued, although information was sparse. He made a mental note to pursue that route once he finished other writing projects. That moment came four years ago in conversation with a former Devereux Heights resident who offered to share his memories and contacts. It spurred some interviews but, noted Mitchell, not enough for a book. 

     Three other writing projects took precedence until earlier this year, when Mitchell was able to pursue the Devereux Heights story, a unique "company coal town" whose residents benefitted from an unusual real estate deal that allowed them to avoid the fate of their counterparts when the coal ran out. 

     Mitchell, who holds degrees from Millikin University in history and political science and from the University of Illinois, Springfield, in biology and education, has had a varied 40-year business career spread across real estate, farming, horse breeding, insurance, sales and marketing. 

 

(Posted  9/2/19)

Looking at the Legacy of Harry H. Devereux

     Harry H. Devereux (1866-1926), whose name is forever linked to Devereux Heights, was a savvy businessman and popular political leader who served two terms as mayor of Springfield (1901-1904). 
     His mother, Marie L. Devereux, believed to be a widow, moved to Springfield in 1871 from Detroit, Michigan, with six-year old Harry in tow.
      In 1880, she married one of the city's most eligible bachelors, widower Redick M. Ridgley, one of 13 sons of Springfield banker, businessman, landowner, and railroad tycoon Nicholas H. Ridgley (one of seven prominent citizens associated with education in Sangamon County who will be featured in the Sangamon County Historical Society's 2019 Echoes of Yesteryear Oak Ridge Cemetery Walk on October 6). 
Redick M. Ridgley had four children from his first marriage: Alice, Janey, Redick Jr. and John and two more children with Marie: a son, William and a daughter, Mabel. 
     Harry Devereux began his business career with an entry level job at Ridgley National Bank but, as Mitchell notes in his new book, "his curiosity and natural business acumen propelled the young man to succeed at all costs," his set of promotions "aided by his step grandfather, the family patriarch, who was president of the bank until his death in 1888." 
     And, says Mitchell, "through love or expediency, or both, the Ridgely connection continued in Harry's life." At age 30, in 1895, Devereux married his step-sister, Alice Ridgely. She died three years later in childbirth, leaving him with a son, also named Harry.  In 1915, he married Nell Selby. They had no children. Devereux died in 1926. preceded by his wife who died in 1918. He was survived by his son and a grandson. 
    
Devereux's main accomplishment, beyond his other business, civic, and political activities and family responsibilities, was the founding of the Chicago-Springfield Coal Company that, says Mitchell, was successful on several levels, not the least of which is "the development of a little village on the north end of Springfield that bears his name and ensures a lasting legacy."


 (Posted  9/2/19)

Annual Oak Ridge Cemetery Walk Set for October 6

     The Sangamon County Historical Society's annual Echoes of Yesteryear Oak Ridge Cemetery Walk will be held on Sunday, October 6 and if past years are any measure, it will attract a substantial turnout, says committee chair Mary Alice Davis.
   "The annual walk continues to grow and we expect that this year it could well set a record, The event has drawn several thousand participants in its 18-year history, many coming from out of the area to take advantage of this opportunity to tour Oak Ridge in a unique way," she adds.
     Oak Ridge is the second most visited national cemetery in the Nation, surpassed only by Arlington in Washington D.C.
     Every year the Society’s Oak Ridge cemetery walk focuses on seven people whose lives had an impact on Sangamon history, with period-garbed actors portraying each figure.
      Last year, as an official Illinois State Bicentennial Event, participants stopped at the grave sites of individuals who played a prominent role in the state's 200 year history: Lincoln's first law partner, John Todd Stuart; civic leader Martha Hicklin, board member and treasurer of the Lincoln Colored Home; Catharine Bergen Jones who cast  her first ballot in 1914 at age 97, the first time women in Illinois were allowed to vote in municipal elections; John Kelly, the first settler of Springfield; Carrie Post  for whom the King's Daughters Home in Springfield was named; Catharine Frazee Lindsay, mother of poet Vachel Lindsay; and Moses Broadwell, Clayville founder.
      This year, tour takers will learn about the lives of six community leaders whose names are associated with Sangamon County schools: James H. Matheny, Elijah Iles, Jesse Dubois, Jacob Bunn, William Butler, Nicholas H. Ridgley,  seventh stop at the grave site of the first woman elected to the Springfield school board, Mary Logan Morrison.
      The two-hour tour will run from Noon to 4 p.m. (the last group will start at 3:15 p.m.). Tour takers will be bused from the starting point at the Oak Ridge Bell Tower  to the first gravesite, then will walk to other sites (a distance totaling about a half mile)  before boarding the bus to return down the hill to the starting point.
    Free parking will be available. The tour is free but a free-will offering will be accepted.
      The 365-acre Oak Ridge Cemetery, bordered on the west by North J. David Jones Parkway (North Walnut Street) and North First Street on the east in Springfield, is the largest municipal cemetery in Illinois. 
    
At the walk, attendees will be able to purchase both publications from the Society and snacks and water from the Springfield and Central Illinois African American History Museum
     They also will be able to view the reproduction of Lincoln's funeral hearse from the P.J. Staab Family Funeral Home that was created for the Lincoln Funeral Reenactment in May 2015 on the 150th anniversary of the President's funeral. (The original was destroyed by fire in 1887). 
   The cemetery walk, co-sponsored by the Society and Oak Ridge Cemetery, was held annually for 13 years beginning in 1996 and ending in 2008. It was brought back five years ago by popular demand.

(Posted 9/2/19)

October 22 Program Meeting

Historian to Separate Myth From Fact in Lincoln’s Assassination

     Historian Timothy S. Good will take a myth-busting look at Lincoln’s assassination when he speaks to the Society on Tuesday, October 22. 
     The date is a week later than the Society’s normal monthly program schedule, but will be held as usual in Carnegie Room North, at the City of Spring-field’s Lincoln Library starting at 5:30 p.m. The session is free and open to the public. 
     Good, whose first book, “We Saw Lincoln Shot: One Hundred Eye Witness Accounts” will be the basis of his presentation at the October 22 meeting, has also written three other books, “American Privateers in the War of 1812: The Vessels and Their Prizes as Recorded in Niles’ Weekly Register,” “ Lincoln for President: An Underdog’s Path to the 1860 Republican Nomination” and “The Lincoln-Douglas De-bates and the Making of a President,” all areas of interest to the 28-year veteran of the National Park Service who was appointed Superintendent of the Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield in 2018. 
     Good holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Valparaiso University, a Master of Arts from the University of Durham, England, and earned a diploma from the United States Naval War College. 
    
Good began his career with the NPS in Washington D.C. at the Ford’s Theater National Historic Site. He has held several national and regional leader-ship posts, most recently as site superintendent for the Ulysses S. Grant site in Missouri be-fore being named to supervise the Lincoln Home National Historic Site He worked at the site from 1996 to 2001. For his book about Lincoln’s assassination, Good drew on 100 accounts of eyewitnesses, reconstructing from their statements an overview of events and an analysis of the sometimes contradictory statements that suggest conclusions that differ

(Posted 9/2/19)

Chatham Library Teams With Illinois Humanities for Portrayal of Elizabeth Keckley

     In a program made possible through the Illinois Humanities Road Scholar Program, area history buffs will be able to learn more about Elizabeth Keckley--dressmaker and confidant to Mary Todd Lincoln-- in a special program on Saturday, September 21 at 1 p.m. Keckley will be portrayed by Marlene Rivero who will relate the story of Mrs. Keckley who had been enslaved, purchased her own freedom, and became Mrs. Lincoln's dressmaker. During a time in our history when it was unheard of for a Black woman to own a business, she did just that, eventually employing over 20 women. The public is invited to attend the presentation at the Library, 600 E. Spruce Street in Chatham. For information call 217-483-2361 or go to chathamlib.org.

 (Posted  7/31/19)

SOCIETY ELECTS OFFICERS FOR 2019-2020

   At its annual meeting on Tuesday, June 18, members of the Sangamon County Historical Society elected officers to lead the Society in 2019-2020.

    Incumbent Vicky Whitaker was re-elected to a second one-year term as president. Whitaker previously served as vice-president and is editor of the Society's monthly newsletter, Historico
Stephanie Martin, who previously served on the board and chaired the Society's membership committee, was elected vice-president. Mary Mucciante, who also served as a director of the Society, was elected secretary. Incumbent Jerry Smith was re-elected treasurer. 

   The Society's 15 board of directors serve staggered three-year terms. When board vacancies arise, candidates can seek to fill the remainder of the term. Elected to the board for a three year term ending in 2022 were Jennie Battles, Kathy Dehen, Mary Schaefer, Larry Stone, Angela Weiss. Elected to fill a one-year vacancy on the board ending in 2020 was Elaine Hoff. 

   For a full list of the 2019-2020 officers, board and committees go to CONTACT US.

   The election was held at the Society's annual dinner held at the Pleasant Plains Historical Society's Clayville Historic Site in Pleasant Plains,15 miles west of Springfield.

   The evening began with a pre-dinner gathering in the new covered outdoor pavilion adjoining the air-conditioned Cunningham Barn which housed the business and dinner portion of the meeting. Historian and past president David Scott was the keynote speaker whose talk focused on the forces that shaped Illinois. Following the meeting, attendees were given a tour of the site that included the restored Broadwell Tavern, a former inn and stagecoach stop built in 1824 that’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places.                                                    Photos by Kathy Dehen


(Posted  7/31/19)

FIVE COMMUNITY GROUPS WIN SOCIETY'S
SPECIAL PROJECTS GRANTS AWARD

   Winners of the Sangamon County Historical Society's Special Projects Grants were announced June 18 at the Society's Annual Dinner, held this year at the Clayville Historic Site in Pleasant Plains. 

   Using a PowerPoint display that illustrated each proposal, Elaine Hoff, chair of the Society's Special Projects Grants committee, revealed the names of each recipient and introduced representatives of the organizations who attended the event as guests of the Society. They, in turn, provided dinner goers with details of their projects.

 The 2019 recipients are:
Central 3 Community First Project Inc., $1,000.
Project: Signage for first black firehouse in Springfield describing its history and role in the 1908 race riot. An architectural drawing of the new façade will be added following completion of restoration.

Springfield And Central Illinois African American History Museum,: $1,000.
Project: Exhibit on the national Negro League players from Springfield and Central Illinois and their impact on area baseball.

Pleasant Plains Historical Society, $500. (Catlin Memorial Award)
Project: Refine and rebuild wheel chair ramps to three historic buildings at its Clayville Historic Site. One award each year is designated the Donna Catlin Memorial Award in memory of the Society's late photographer, Donna Catlin who was widely known for her photographs of historic sites, amiong them Clayville.

Oak Ridge National Cemetery, $500
Project: Create an interpretive marker with historical information about the former third street enrance sign (circa 1900), now restored and ready for display at the cemetery bell tower.

Springfield Art Association/Historic Edwards Place, $500.
Project: Traveling history trunk program to bring history into the classroom.

(If you'd like to know more about the Society's Special Project Grants program and read more the past projects that have been funded, see GRANTS).

(Posted  7/31/19)

COMMITTEE MEETS TO SHAPE OCTOBER 6
17th ANNUAL OAK RIDGE CEMETERY WALK

   Plans for the Society's Annual Echoes of Yesteryear Oak Ridge Cemetery Walk on Sunday, October 6, have begun, kicked off in May with site selections, followed by a committee meeting in June that included the first trial walk, all underscoring the areas it must address in planning an event that continues to break attendance records.

   In addition to chairperson Mary Alice Davis (seated, center), members of the committee are (from left) Jerry Smith, Jennie Battles, Linda Schneider, Ruth Slottag, Susan Helm, Mike Kienzler, Ernie Slottag, Pete Harbison and Mike Lelys, executive director of Oak Ridge. Also serving on the committee but not pictured are Curtis Mann and Larry Stone.

   The walk, free and open to the public, will have stops at the grave sites of six early Sangamon County residents who have schools named for them and a seventh stop at the grave site of the first woman elected to the Springfield school board. Dressed in period costumes, re-enactors at each site will take the audience back to an earlier time, providing insight into the personal lives of the individuals they are portraying based on extensive historic research. 

   The event will run from Noon to 4 p.m., with the last tour starting at 3:15 p.m. 
The 365-acre Oak Ridge Cemetery, bordered on the west by North J. David Jones Parkway (North Walnut Street) and North First Street on the east in Springfield, is the largest municipal cemetery in Illinois and is the second most visited cemetery in the United States after Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.

   Attendees will be transported by bus from the start of the tour at the Oak Ridge Bell Tower, to the first gravesite, then walk to the other gravesites before boarding the bus to return down the hill to the starting point, a distance of about a half mile. 

   At the walk, attendees will be able to purchase both publications from the Society and snacks from the Springfield and Central Illinois African American History Museum. They also will be able to view the reproduction of Lincoln's funeral hearse from the P.J. Staab Family Funeral Home that was created for the Lincoln Funeral Reenactment in May 2015 on the 150th anniversary of the President's funeral. (The original was destroyed by fire in 1887).

   The cemetery walk, co-sponsored by the Society and Oak Ridge Cemetery, was held annually for 12 years beginning in 1996 and ending in 2008. It was brought back five years ago by popular demand. 

(Posted  7/31/19)

EIGHTH ANNUAL TRIVIA NIGHT DATE SET

   Trivia fans will have lots of time to put on their thinking caps. 

   Fresh from its most successful Trivia Night to date, the Society has set the date for its 2020 version: Saturday, March 21.

   "The location, Parish Hall at Christ the King Church in Springfield (right), will remain the same," says Mary Alice Davis, co-chair of the Society's Programs & Events committee who has guided the event since its inception.

   "This is our major fundraiser that helps underwrite our Special Projects Grant program, so we wanted to make sure that the date is on the radar, especially among die-hard trivia players who look forward to our event." Doors will open at 6 p.m. and as in past years, you'll be able to reserve and pay for tables of and individual seats on line or by mail. "It's always a fun night," Davis adds.

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